Have one of these phones? You’re getting Galaxy AI features soon | Digital Trends

Have one of these phones? You’re getting Galaxy AI features soon | Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra (left) and Galaxy S24 Ultra Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

If you bought a Samsung phone within the last year or so, get ready for a big software update heading your way soon. On February 21, Samsung confirmed that a number of its older smartphones are getting Galaxy AI features as part of the One UI 6.1 update in “late March.”

Samsung introduced Galaxy AI last month with the debut of the Galaxy S24 series. While the AI features have been exclusive to the S24 handsets since their release in January, this upcoming One UI 6.1 update will allow a lot more people to check them out for themselves.

As Samsung has previously confirmed, the following devices will receive the Galaxy AI toolkit when One UI 6.1 lands in March:

  • Samsung Galaxy S23, S23 Plus, and S23 Ultra
  • Samsung Galaxy S23 FE
  • Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 5
  • Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 5
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab S9, S9 Plus, and S9 Ultra

When you get Galaxy AI on any of these devices next month, there’s a lot to check out. Circle to Search is one of the most useful features. It allows you to perform a Google Search for anything you see on your phone just by circling or scribbling on it. There are also helpful translation tools for in-person and phone conversations, powerful AI photo-editing tools, and a feature called “Chat Assist” that can help adjust the tone of your messages. Some of these are less successful than others.

Samsung has also confirmed that its Galaxy AI features will cost money at some point, though it hasn’t said how much or when exactly that will happen. For the foreseeable future, though, all of these features will remain free whether you’re using them on a Galaxy S24 or one of the above devices when they get the One UI 6.1 update in March.

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Samsung Will Roll Out Galaxy AI to Older Smartphones Next Month

Samsung Will Roll Out Galaxy AI to Older Smartphones Next Month

Samsung’s Galaxy AI features are coming to more Galaxy devices.
Image: Samsung

Great news for those of you holding out on trading up for a Galaxy S24 Ultra. Samsung has announced that its Galaxy AI features are coming to more smartphones. That means Circle to Search, Live Translation, Instant Slow-Mo, and Generative Edit are coming to an older Samsung device near you.

The Galaxy AI features are rolling out through a long-speculated software update. The update is for OneUI 6.1, which refers to Samsung’s version of Android. This package will include all the marquee Galaxy AI features, from Google’s Circle to Search to Samsung’s Edit Suggestion. It also bundles in auto summarization capabilities for exclusive apps such as Samsung Notes and quick photo editing features in Samsung’s Gallery app. And like on Google’s Pixel smartphones, the update enables the ability to generate wallpapers on a Samsung device.

There is a smattering of non-Galaxy AI-branded features as part of the OneUI 6.1 rollout. For one, more Lock Screen widgets are coming with support for Samsung’s apps, like Samsung Health, and the company is rolling out its version of Android’s adaptive charging mode, Battery Protection. The feature ensures your device doesn’t stay fully charged on the dock all night long, wearing out the battery cycles. The update also includes switching to Quick Share with its official Google-via-Samsung rebranding.

The One 6.1 update will be available for all Galaxy S23 smartphones, including the Galaxy S23 Ultra and the Galaxy S23 FE. The Galaxy Z Fold 5 and Z Flip 5 are also a part of the update lineup, as are a few tablets: the Galaxy Tab S9 Ultra, Tab S9, and Tab S9+.

Samsung says it plans to bring Galaxy AI to “over 100 million” of its users. It’s possible there could be more devices on the update list further on. If you’ve got any of the devices listed above, you can expect to see the software update in late March 2024.

Samsung adding Auracast and 360 Audio to more TVs, phones, and earbuds | Digital Trends

Samsung adding Auracast and 360 Audio to more TVs, phones, and earbuds | Digital Trends

Phil Nickinson / Digital Trends

Samsung today announced a series of updates for some televisions and a trio of earbuds that will add features across the board, and also allow everything to play together that much more.

Auracast is one of the more interesting features on the way. It essentially allows one device to pick up a signal being broadcast by another, not unlike a radio. Samsung has had Auracast on select TVs for a while now, and it’s been available on multiple Galaxy Buds earbuds. Now, it’s expanding to phones and tablets. The ability to broadcast will hit the Galaxy S24 and S23 phones, the Galaxy Z Fold 5 and Z Flip 5, and the Tab S9 series. (They’ll all need to have One UI 6.1 or newer.) And the ability to listen to an Auracast broadcast is coming to the Galaxy S24 series, S23 series, Z Fold5, Z Fold4, Z Flip5, Z Flip4, A54 5G, M54 5G, Tab S9 series, Tab S9 FE series and Tab Active 5 5G with One UI 5.1.1 or above.

We demoed Auracast at CES 2024. It’s going to be a game-changer. Maybe not right away, but it opens up some really cool possibilities.

Then there’s 360 Audio, which is what it sounds like, as it makes it sound like the sound is coming from all around you. Samsung previously supported it on phones and tablets, and now it’s coming to more devices. Samsung says it’ll work with the Galaxy Buds2 Pro and Buds 2. And it’ll be served up from TVs including the Samsung Neo QLED 8K (QN900D, QN800D), Neo QLED 4K (QN95D, QN90D, QN87D, QN85D), OLED (S95D, S90D, S85D) and QLED (Q80D, Q70D).

Samsung is also making it easier to switch functionality between devices. So if you’re using your Samsung Galaxy Buds with your Samsung TV and a call comes in, things should automatically shift the headphones back to the phone and then back to the TV once the call is over. And an update will help bring this switching to the Galaxy Book4, as well. All this seamless switching will work with the Galaxy Buds2 Pro, Galaxy phones and tablets with One UI 4.1.1 and up, the Galaxy Book series with One UI 6.0 and up, Galaxy Watch 4, and Samsung TVs from February 2022 and newer.

And if you’re using Galaxy Buds and a Galaxy S24 phone, you’ll be able to take advantage of real-time translation, where another person talks into your phone, and you hear the translation in your Buds. Then they’ll hear the translation on their end through your phone speaker.

Samsung says updates should start pushing live in late February.

Editors’ Recommendations






Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Google Pixel 8 Pro: a tough battle | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Google Pixel 8 Pro: a tough battle | Digital Trends

Google Pixel 8 Pro (left) and Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

This year, Samsung has broken new ground with its Galaxy S24 lineup, delivering not only the excellent year-over-year performance enhancements we’ve come to expect from Qualcomm’s flagship Snapdragon chips, but a whole new suite of Galaxy AI features that let you translate conversations, enhance your photos, summarize your notes, and more.

In the case of Samsung’s premium flagship, the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra, those are joined by a new titanium frame and some camera enhancements that change things up in interesting and exciting ways. Plus, the new Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy provides more than enough performance to spare.

On the other hand, those who have followed Google’s Pixel series of phones probably already know that the search giant is no stranger to AI-powered features. Google has been building custom Tensor series chips for a couple of years now, focusing on powering the machine learning capabilities that allow its phones to punch well above their weight class when it comes to photography.

Although the first two Tensor generations delivered on that promise, they often came up short in other areas. However, the Tensor G3 in last year’s Google Pixel 8 Pro impressed us with enough raw power to make it a more serious contender for those looking for top-notch gaming and multitasking performance. Does it have enough to take on Samsung’s extreme Galaxy S24 Ultra, especially now that Samsung is baking in similar AI to compete in Google’s arena? Let’s dig in and find out.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: specs

  Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra Pixel 8 Pro
Size 162.56 x 78.99 x 8.64 mm (6.4 x 3.11 x 0.34 inches) 162.6 x 76.5 x 8.8 mm (6.4 x 3.01 x 0.35 in)
Weight 233 grams (8.22 ounces) 213 grams (7.51 ounces)
Screen

6.8-inch QHD+ Dynamic AMOLED 2X Display with Super Smooth 120Hz refresh rate (1~120Hz)

6.7-inch LTPO OLED with 120Hz refresh rate and 1,600 nits brightness, 2,400 nits (peak)
Screen resolution

3120 x 1440 pixels at 505 pixels per inch

2992 x 1344 pixels at 489 pixels per inch
Operating system Android 14 with One UI 6.1 Android 14
Storage 256GB, 512GB, 1TB 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB
MicroSD card slot No No
Processor Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy Google Tensor G3
Camera Rear: 200-megapixel (MP) main camera (wide), 12MP Ultrawide, 50MP 5X telephoto, 10MP 3x telephoto.

Front: 12MP

Rear: 50-megapixel (MP) main camera (wide), 48MP ultrawide, 48MP 5X telephoto.

Front: 10.5MP

Video UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 30 frames per second (fps), slow motion UHD at 120 fps, slow motion FHD at 240 fps 4K at 60 frames per second (fps), 1080p at 240 fps
Cellular 5G mmWave (U.S. models only), 5G (sub-6GHz), 5G mmWave, sub-6GHz
Bluetooth version Bluetooth 5.3 Bluetooth 5.3
Ports USB-C USB-C
Water resistance IP68 IP68
Battery 5,000 mAh with 45W wired fast charging, Fast Wireless Charging 2.0 and Wireless PowerShare 5,050mAh with 30W wired fast charging and 23W wireless charging
Network support All major carriers All major carriers
Colors Titanium Gray, Titanium Black, Titanium Violet, and Titanium Yellow, plus Samsung exclusive Titanium Blue, Titanium Green, and Titanium Orange Obsidian black, Porcelain white, Bay Blue
Price Starting at $1,300 Starting at $999

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: design

The back of the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra, Google Pixel 8 Pro, and Google Pixel 7 Pro.
Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra (from left), Google Pixel 8 Pro, and Google Pixel 7 Pro Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

It’s fair to say that Samsung and Google have both developed their own iconic design languages over the past couple of years, with new models boasting evolutionary changes rather than revolutionary ones.

For Samsung, the Galaxy Ultra lineup dropped the classic camera bump two years ago in favor of letting the lenses stand on their own. It clearly liked that aesthetic, as it’s since brought it not only to the rest of the Galaxy S family, but even to its midrange and entry-level A-series phones. Hence, it’s no surprise that Samsung’s Galaxy S24 Ultra follows in the same footsteps.

However, that doesn’t mean nothing’s changed. This year, Samsung moved its flagship phone from its classic Armor Aluminum alloy to a titanium frame. While that technically allows it to shed a few grams, that’s not the real bonus here, as there’s a minimal weight difference between aluminum and titanium. Rather, the Galaxy S24 Ultra now gets a boost in durability, added scratch resistance, and a more attractive look. It also feels warmer to the touch and easier to keep a hold on. You may want to think twice about putting this one in a case.

The Google Pixel 8 Pro and Google Pixel 7 Pro being held next to each other.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Similarly, Google’s Pixel 8 Pro can be tricky to distinguish from its predecessor at first glance unless you know what you’re looking for. It sports Google’s signature camera bar that helps set the Pixel family apart from other smartphones, but now combines the lenses into a single cutout. However, once you pick it up and look a bit closer, it’s clear Google has made some nice design refinements that add a touch of elegance and craftsmanship. The glass back is now matte, making it less of a fingerprint magnet, and it feels great in the hand, especially with the corners being more rounded.

While the Galaxy S24 Ultra technically comes in slightly larger and heftier with its 6.8-inch screen, it’s not significantly more so than the Pixel 8 Pro. We’re talking about 2.5 millimeters in width and 20 grams in weight; the extra tenth-of-an-inch for the display comes from narrower bezels on Samsung’s part, and any difference when holding the new phones can be chalked up to the different materials and designs used in each. Glass and titanium feel very different, and Samsung and Google have also gone in opposite directions with the edges, with the Pixel 8 Pro getting more curves while the Galaxy S24 Ultra gets less.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra does have an edge over the Pixel 8 Pro in terms of durability, with Samsung opting for Corning’s latest Gorilla Armor Glass this year. It’s more scratch-resistant and less reflective than last year’s Gorilla Glass Victus 2, which is still used on the Pixel 8 Pro. It’s unclear how much of a difference this makes in impact protection, but the reduced glare keeps the screen noticeably more visible when dealing with bright overhead lights or direct sunlight. Both phones also feature an IP68 rating for dust and water resistance. Samsung specifies up to 1.5 meters of protection for 30 minutes on the Galaxy S24 Ultra. While Google has never said precisely what its IP68 rating means, we expect it’s very similar, as IP68 has to offer more than one meter of water resistance for at least 30 minutes.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra and Pixel 8 Pro both feature stunning designs in their own ways, and while Samsung’s phone has some minor advantages with its newer Armor Glass, we don’t think those are enough to tilt the scales over what ultimately comes down to a personal choice for buyers.

Winner: Tie

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: display

The Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra and Galaxy S24 Ultra's screens in bright sunlight, showing differences in reflection.
Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra (left) and Galaxy S24 Ultra Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Samsung’s phones have always had some of the best AMOLED displays on the market, which is no surprise considering that Samsung has its own display division that produces a large percentage of the displays used on every phone on the market — including the Pixel 8 Pro.

However, Samsung naturally reserves its best displays for its smartphones, and the best of the best naturally land in its top-of-the-line Galaxy S24 Ultra. What you’re getting here isn’t a significant change from last year’s Galaxy S23 Ultra — it’s still a 6.8-inch AMOLED 2X panel with a 1Hz to 120Hz adaptive refresh rate and a negligible bump to a 3120 x 1440 resolution — but it’s gotten much brighter, with a new peak outdoor brightness of 2,600 nits.

We found that to be a noticeable increase from the 1,750 of the S23 Ultra, which, combined with the new Gorilla Armor Glass, makes the screen much easier to see on even the brightest days. The Adaptive Brightness also behaves well when working in bright light, avoiding the temptation to automatically dim your screen to save a bit of battery life.

The Google Pixel 8 Pro and Google Pixel 7 Pro's screens.
This comparison photo of the Google Pixel 8 Pro (left) and Google Pixel 7 Pro shows the difference in screen curvature. Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Google’s Pixel 8 Pro has adopted a different display from its predecessor, which the company has dubbed its new “Super Actua” display. It’s an LTPO OLED screen with the same 120Hz variable refresh rate and always-on capabilities, but it’s pushes the outdoor brightness up to 2,400 nits. That was the best we’d seen on any smartphone when the Pixel 8 Pro was released; it’s naturally been leapfrogged by Samsung and others since, but it’s more of a paper chase now as we’re reaching the point of diminishing returns. Anything above 2,000 nits seems to be good enough for most outdoor use, and it’s unlikely you’ll notice much difference between Google’s 2,400 nits and Samsung’s 2,600 nits in raw brightness. If anything, Samsung’s new glass helps with outdoor visibility far more than those extra 200 nits.

Like Samsung, the biggest change in Google’s display is the increased brightness. It offers a 2992 x 1344 resolution for a density of 489 pixels per inch (ppi). That’s slightly lower than the 505 ppi on the Galaxy S24 Ultra, but it’s not a difference you’ll notice with the naked eye. However, the Pixel 8 Pro has another trick up its sleeve that helps narrow the gap with the S24 Ultra: it can now dial the refresh rate down to the same 1Hz, letting it use less battery power in always-on display mode.

The screen on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra and the Google Pixel 8 Pro.
This comparison photo  shows the difference in screen reflection between the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra (left) and Google Pixel 8 Pro. Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Both displays deliver excellent quality, with deep, rich colors and crisp text, and we don’t think anyone will be disappointed with either. Still, Samsung gains a new edge with an improved always-on display that departs from the classic monochromatic look that’s graced most Android phones. Instead, it seems to have taken a page out of Apple’s book by allowing a more colorful view that allows you to keep a dimmed version of your wallpaper and notifications in view.

That became a polarizing feature when Apple introduced it — people seemed to either love it or hate it — and Apple eventually had to provide a way to turn it off. Samsung has learned from that, and it’s wisely offering that option out of the gate. You don’t have to use it if you don’t want to, but it’s hard to argue that it’s a nice option to have and makes the Galaxy S24 Ultra stand out from the pack.

Winner: Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: performance and battery

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra's screen, resting against a post.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Samsung has once again worked with Qualcomm to bring its own bespoke version of the chipmaker’s latest flagship system-on-a-chip (SoC) to the Galaxy S24 Ultra. The Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 is already a ridiculously powerful chip, and Samsung’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy coaxes even more out of it for Samsung’s top-performing flagship and its One UI 6.1 flavor of Android. According to Qualcomm, that works out to a boost of 20% in the CPU and 26% in the GPU over last year’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 for Galaxy, compared to a 30% performance boost between the two non-Galaxy generations of the SoC.

Packing in 12GB of RAM across all of its storage configurations, the S24 Ultra not only had no problems handling the latest demanding mobile games, but also ran surprisingly cool, suggesting there’s power here to spare. For instance, we found that extended playtimes of games like Asphalt 9: Legends barely warmed things up; it took demanding benchmarking tests to make a noticeable difference, but the S24 Ultra never got too hot to handle.

Browsing Digital Trends on the Google Pixel 8 Pro in Google Chrome.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Unsurprisingly, Google’s Pixel 8 Pro still packs in one of the company’s own Tensor chips — a third-generation Tensor G3 in this case — but the good news is that Google has made some nice improvements to performance and thermal management compared to the previous iterations of the chip. In announcing the Tensor G3, Google promised that “every major subsystem has been upgraded,” which translates to a noticeable performance boost.

Can it hold its own against the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy? Although the Tensor G3 doesn’t match the raw benchmarks on paper, in practical terms, we don’t think most folks will notice any difference worth caring about. The Pixel 8 Pro could handle everything we threw at it, including the latest demanding mobile games and multitasking between multiple apps. There was no stuttering or lagging, nor any of the overheating problems that plagued the Tensor G2-equipped Pixel 7 lineup. It seems Google has finally decided to shift away from its somewhat myopic focus on machine learning that hampered its previous Tensor chips.

Playing video games on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra.
Samsung

We’re long past the point where raw power means much to the user-facing experience on flagship smartphones. Instead, the extra headroom provided by both the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy and the Tensor G3 is there to power more sophisticated features like computational photography and AI. And this year, Qualcomm has changed that equation, moving onto Google’s turf by adding some sophisticated machine learning capabilities to its latest premium Snapdragon chip. We’ll talk more about those later.

If there area any areas where the Galaxy S24 Ultra is a clear winner, it’s in its battery life and charging performance. While the Pixel 8 Pro should get you through a full day thanks to the Tensor G3’s improved power efficiency, that still doesn’t hold a candle to the incredible stamina of the Galaxy S24 Ultra, which can end a busy day with 50% remaining, even after five hours of screen time used for gaming, video streaming, and calls. That’s despite both phones having similar-sized batteries (5,000mAh for the S24 Ultra and 5,050mAh for the Pixel 8 Pro), so it’s a testament to Samsung and Qualcomm’s power-management capabilities.

With its usual 45-watt charging, the Galaxy S24 Ultra still isn’t the fastest-charging smartphone on the market — that honor still goes to the OnePlus 12 — but it still beats out the Pixel 8 Pro’s 30W speeds. Practically, that works out to about a 20-minute difference in the time it takes to charge each phone from zero to full — 70 minutes for the S24 Ultra versus 90 minutes for the Pixel 8 Pro.

Winner: Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: cameras

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra in Titanium Orange and in Titanium Silver.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

When it comes to cameras, Samsung puts the most premium camera hardware available into its Galaxy Ultra phones, while Google leans toward slightly above-average sensors driven by sophisticated computational photography algorithms.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra and Pixel 8 Pro both follow that trend, although each has been gradually encroaching into the other’s territory. This year, Samsung is taking advantage of the new AI and image-processing capabilities of the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 to power new photo and video experiences, while also borrowing a page from some of its competitors by using pixel-cropping techniques to offer more optical-quality focal lengths. For its part, Google has packed some nice sensor upgrades into the Pixel 8 Pro to give the computational photography engine in its Tensor G3 more to work with.

A person holding the Google Pixel 8 Pro.
Google Pixel 8 Pro Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Ultra came with a change that surprised many folks at first blush: the elimination of its legendary 10x telephoto lens in favor of a 5x shooter. However, there was a method to Samsung’s seeming madness, as it also upped its best telephoto camera to a 50-megapixel (MP) sensor, a huge jump from the 10MP one on the S23 Ultra that not only delivers better quality images, but also still lets you capture 10x optical-quality shots with its Adaptive Pixel Sensor Technology. Of course, the digital zoom capabilities are all still here, with to a 100x “Space Zoom.”

Combined with the 3x telephoto lens, which remains mostly unchanged from last year, this provides Galaxy S24 Ultra owners with a new and arguably much more useful 5x zoom to play with since it’s entirely optical. As for the 10x zoom, technically you’ll only be shooting a 10MP photo in that mode, as Samsung is using a pixel-cropping technique to double the 5x zoom by using the center of the 50MP sensor, but that’s the same resolution the Galaxy S23 Ultra provided with its 10MP 10x telephoto camera, and the results speak for themselves.

Google’s Pixel 8 Pro has improved the sensors of its predecessor in light capture, with the main 50MP shooter promised to collect 21% more light and the two 48MP sensors in the telephoto and ultrawid, increasing that by 56% and 105%, respectively.

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra's camera lenses.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

While those numbers may not look nearly as impressive as Samsung’s 200MP main sensor and dual telephoto lenses, the computational photography features of Google’s Tensor chips have always managed to produce exceptional results with relatively modest camera sensors. The Pixel 8 Pro effortlessly takes the kind of phenomenal photos we’ve come to expect from a Pixel phone. Colors are natural, balanced, and lively without being oversaturated, and there’s plenty of detail. For the company that pioneered night mode smartphone photography, it’s also no surprise that the Pixel 8 Pro still produces the best night mode photos you’ll find — and they’ve only gotten better with the increased light sensitivity of the cameras.

That’s not to say the Galaxy S24 Ultra is lacking in any meaningful way. If you want the best telephoto lens system you can get on a smartphone, and prefer photos that are more punchy, vibrant, and colorful, Samsung’s flagship is the phone for you. The good news is that Samsung also seems to have dialed the saturation down a bit compared to last year’s model, so while it’s not quite as ideally balanced as the Pixel 8 Pro, colors do look more natural.

The bottom line is that both phones take great pictures with different trade-offs. The Pixel 8 Pro will give you more natural hues and better lowlight and night shots, while the Galaxy S24 Ultra provides exceptional zoom capabilities with more vibrant colors that may not appeal to everyone.

Winner: Tie

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: software and updates

A person holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra showing the screen.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Ultra and Pixel 8 Pro both ship with Android 14, although Google provides its usual “pure Google” experience while Samsung layers its One UI 6.1 on top. Each of these will appeal to a different audience, and despite the Pixel 8 Pro running just Android 14 sans any “skins,” it still packs in its own set of unique features specific to Google’s Pixel lineup.

However, Google raised the stakes last year when it promised a staggering seven years of Android updates and Pixel Feature Drops that will keep its latest flagship phone relevant until October 2030, when Android 21 comes along.

Not to be outdone, Samsung has followed suit, matching Google’s promise with its Galaxy S24 lineup, which should also take it to Android 21 and One UI 13.

Winner: Tie

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: special features

A person using the S Pen stylus with the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

While Google’s Pixel lineup has been the undisputed king of AI features for the past few years, Samsung is throwing its hat into the ring with the Galaxy S24 Ultra and a new suite of Galaxy AI capabilities.

These primarily come thanks to the improvements in Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 chip, which has embraced machine learning in a big way. Samsung is leveraging these new capabilities to build new translation, transcription, and photo-editing features that could theoretically give Google a run for its money.

However, the key word here is “theoretically.” Google has a healthy head start in this area, both in software features and in the neural engines in its Tensor chips. By comparison, Samsung is a babe in the woods, and it shows with Galaxy AI.

A person holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra using the Circle to Search feature.
Circle to Search Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

For example, one of the most compelling AI features on the Galaxy S24 Ultra is Circle to Search by Google, but that’s not an exclusive feature. As the name suggests, Google built it, so it was inevitable that it would come to the Pixel 8 Pro, along with some other cool generative AI enhancements for composing messages and transforming photos into stickers.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra also includes new Interpreter and Live Translate features that can translate both live in-person conversations and phone calls in real time, plus AI-generated summaries and transcriptions in Samsung Notes that can transcribe and translate voice recordings to text from multiple speakers.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra also gains some photo- and video-editing capabilities that can fill in backgrounds and suggest enhancements to images. An AI-assisted slow-motion mode can also turn a regular video into a slow-motion one by interpolating the missing frames needed to slow it down. It works well and lets you create more whimsical experiences by slowing down only selected portions.

Google Pixel 8 Pro in hand showing Magic Editor with Stylized results.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

Still, many of these are features that Google’s Pixel phones have had for a while in some form or another. Google’s Magic Eraser has become almost legendary, and this year, it bolstered it with Audio Magic Eraser to do the same for audio clips, plus a Magic Editor feature that goes beyond simply erasing objects to let you move them around and change the lightning.

Beyond photographic features, the Pixel 8 Pro also includes built-in proofreading tools in Gboard, object and pet recognition for the selfie camera, and the ability for Google Assistant to summarize a web page for you. Suffice it to say that Google will likely remain ahead of the curve on the AI side for a while, although Galaxy AI will at least help Samsung fans look less longingly at what they’re missing.

However, with all the hype around generative AI these days, it may be hard to believe there’s still more to a phone than just AI features. But the Galaxy S24 Ultra has at least one thing that makes it stand out from the pack in the form of its S Pen. It’s hard to beat for those who would rather jot their thoughts down on the expansive 6.8-inch screen than type them in.

Winner: Tie

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: price and availability

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra and the S Pen stylus.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Ultra comes in at $100 more this year, with the base 256GB model starting at $1,300. There are also higher 512GB and 1TB storage capacities available. You can find it at most major retailers and carriers in Titanium Gray, Titanium Black, Titanium Violet, and Titanium Yellow, with exclusive Titanium Blue, Titanium Green, and Titanium Orange colors available if you order directly from Samsung.

Google’s Pixel 8 Pro starts at a much more wallet-friendly $999, although that will only get you a 128GB model. However, you can move up to a comparable 256GB configuration for only $60 more. It’s available for purchase now from Google and other retailers and comes in Obsidian, Porcelain, and Bay colors.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Pixel 8 Pro: verdict

Google Pixel 8 Pro in hand.
Prakhar Khanna / Digital Trends

Even at the same price, the choice between Samsung’s Galaxy S24 Ultra and Google Pixel 8 Pro would be a tough call, but Google’s flagship has one essential thing going for it: It can be had for $300 less than Samsung’s beastly powerhouse.

At this price, we think the Pixel 8 Pro is the best flagship for most people. It takes excellent pictures under a wide range of conditions, the new Tensor G3 chip delivers the performance needed by everyone except the most hardcore mobile gamers, and Google also has a proven track record in delivering AI features that work well. The only significant knocks against the Pixel 8 Pro are its average battery life and slower charging; however, there’s still enough here to get most folks through a full day of use between charges.

None of that is to say that Samsung’s Galaxy S24 Ultra doesn’t have its own set of advantages. You get the best telephoto cameras available on any smartphone today with substantially longer-range zoom capabilities while still being able to capture outstanding photos. There’s also little doubt that the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 chip can handle anything you throw at it without breaking a sweat — and it’s likely to provide that top-tier performance for another couple of years, even as new Android and One UI updates demand more from it. While the jury is still out on the Galaxy AI features and where the line is drawn between “useful” and “gimmick,” if you leave those aside, it’s still an ideal phone for those who want no-compromise performance and are willing to pay the premium to get it.


Editors’ Recommendations






Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. S24 Plus: closer than you’d think | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. S24 Plus: closer than you’d think | Digital Trends

Galaxy S24 Ultra (left) and Galaxy S24 Plus Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S24 series consists of three handsets, just like the previous generation. Apart from the standard Galaxy S24, there are two other options: the Galaxy S24 Plus and the higher-end Galaxy S24 Ultra. While the two more expensive models share many features, several differences should be considered when deciding which one to buy.

In this article, we’ll focus on the Galaxy S24 Plus and its similarities and differences with the Galaxy S24 Ultra — and ultimately help you decide which one you should spend your hard-earned money on.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: specs

  Galaxy S24 Ultra Galaxy S24 Plus
Weight 8.18 oz (233 g) 12.25 oz (197 g)
Dimensions 6.4 x 3.11 x 0.338 inches (162.6 × 79.0 × 8.6mm) 6.24 x 3 x 0.299 inches (158.5 × 76.2 × 7.6mm
Screen size, specs

6.8-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X

Corning Gorilla Armor

6.7-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X

Corning Gorilla Glass Victus 2

Screen resolution 3120 x 1440 pixels, 19.5:9, 505 ppi

120Hz refresh rate

2,600 nits peak brightness

3120 x 1440 pixels, 19.5:9 ratio, 512 ppi

120Hz refresh rate

2,600 nits peak brightness

Operating system Android 14 and One UI 6.1 Android 14 and One UI 6.1
Storage 256GB, 512GB, 1TB 256GB, 512GB
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 (4 nm) Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 (4 nm)
RAM 12GB 12GB
Camera 200MP main, f/1.7

12MP ultrawide, f/2.2

10MP telephoto, f/2.4 (3x zoom)

50MP telephoto, f/3.4 (5x zoom)

12MP front, f/2.2

50MP main, f/1.8

12MP ultrawide, f/2.2

10MP telephoto, f/2.4 (3× zoom)

12MP front, f/2.2

Video 8K at 24 / 30fps (main lens only)

4K at 30 / 60fps (all lenses)

4K at 30 / 60 fps (front)

8K at 24 / 30fps (main lens only)

4K at 30 / 60fps (all lenses)

4K at 30 / 60fps (front)

Galaxy AI Yes Yes
Authentication Ultrasonic in-screen fingerprint Ultrasonic in-screen fingerprint
Resistance Water, Dust; IP68 Water, Dust; IP68
Battery

5,000 mAh

45W wired charging

15W wireless charging

4.5W reverse wireless charging

4,900 mAh
45W wired charging
15W wireless charging
4.5W reverse wireless charging

Network support 5G (sub-6, mmWave) 5G (sub-6, mmWave)
Colors  Titanium Black

Titanium Gray

Titanium Violet

Titanium Yellow

Titanium Green

Titanium Blue

Titanium Orange

Onyx Black

Marble Gray

Cobalt Violet

Amber Yellow

Jade Green

Sapphire Blue

Sandstone Orange

S-Pen support Yes  No
Price From $1,300 From $1,000

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: design and display

The Galaxy S24 Plus and Galaxy S24 Ultra are both premium smartphones. However, the Galaxy S24 Ultra has some distinctive features that make it slightly superior to the former. Its titanium body and square edges provide an exquisite look, but the S24 Plus isn’t a slouch in this department, either. It has an aluminum frame instead of titanium, plus flat edges that allow you to easily grip the phone.

On the display front, there are more similarities than differences. The Galaxy S24 Plus features a 6.7-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X display, while the S24 Ultra has a slightly larger 6.8-inch screen. Both screens have a Quad HD+ resolution (3120 x 1440 pixels) and a peak brightness of 2,600 nits. Both the S24 Plus and S24 Ultra also have variable refresh rates that can go all the way up to 120Hz and all the way down to just 1Hz. No matter which phone you choose, these are both excellent screens.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra has superior Gorilla Armor glass, which is more durable than the Gorilla Victus 2 protection found on the other model. It also allows the S24 Ultra’s display to handle reflections much better than any other phone — and the results are legitimately impressive.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: performance and battery

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus resting on a concrete slab, with the screen turned on and showing the home screen.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

In the U.S., the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus and Galaxy S24 Ultra are powered by the same chipset, a modified Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3. This Snapdragon version provides a high-end processor designed for exceptional performance and power efficiency. It uses TSMC’s 4nm process node (N4P). In some locations, however, the Galaxy S24 Plus features Samsung’s in-house Exynos 2400 processor, which many have frowned upon. In the U.S., though, performance on both the S24 Plus and S24 Ultra is excellent. Each phone handles simple tasks and demanding games with ease, and neither one works up too much of a sweat while doing so.

The Galaxy S24 Plus includes a 4,900mAh battery, which is 200mAh larger than the one found on the Galaxy S23 Plus. Our review said battery life was one of the “most impressive qualities” of the Galaxy S24 Plus, which can last up to two days between charges.

Meanwhile, the Galaxy S24 Ultra has a 5,000mAh battery, just like last year’s model. Again, depending on what you’re doing, you can expect to see up to two days of battery life between charges. Both phones also share the same charging capabilities, meaning 45-watt wired charging, 15W wireless charging, and 4.5W reverse wireless charging.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: cameras

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra's camera lenses.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

It’s not surprising that the Galaxy S24 Ultra has a better camera system than the Galaxy S24 Plus, as it is one of the main reasons why the Ultra is more expensive. The Galaxy S24 Ultra has a 200-megapixel primary camera, a 12MP wide-angle camera, and a 10MP telephoto camera with 3x optical zoom, just like last year’s model. However, the all-new 50MP telephoto camera now provides 5x and 10x optical quality zoom. On the front, there is a 12MP selfie camera.

On the other hand, the Plus model’s camera remains unchanged this year. It still has a 50MP primary camera, a 10MP telephoto camera with 3x optical zoom, a 12MP ultrawide camera, and a 12MP selfie camera. The cameras on both models are enhanced with software features, and many are now powered by artificial intelligence.

If you want a dependable camera for casual shooting, the Galaxy S24 Plus is no slouch at all in this department. It may not be the most impressive camera suite we’ve ever seen, but all three of its rear cameras (plus the selfie shooter) deliver nice-looking photos. The real advantage of the S24 Ultra comes from its more capable main camera and its enhanced zoom capabilities.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: Galaxy AI and S Pen

A person holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra using the Circle to Search feature.
Circle to Search Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Like the Galaxy S24, the Galaxy S24 Plus and Galaxy S24 Ultra include new Galaxy AI features. These start with the Circle to Search tool that allows you to search on your device simply by circling images or text on the screen. For instance, if you circle a picture of a store on your screen, the phone will automatically bring up information about that store, such as its location, reviews, and availability.

The Live Translate feature also has shown great promise. If you’re talking to someone on the phone who speaks a different language, you can use this feature to translate and transcribe what they say in real time. Both phones will display the translation on the screen and provide an audio translation, making communicating with people who speak different languages easy.

Notes Assist lets you quickly summarize text into clear, easy-to-review highlights. This is especially useful when you’re reading a lengthy document or article and want to capture the main points quickly.

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra and the S Pen stylus.
Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Finally, the Generative Edit feature enables you to perform powerful photo-editing tricks on your Galaxy S24. You can move subjects in your photos, remove unwanted objects, and more. This feature is perfect for those who love to take pictures and want to enhance them without using a separate photo-editing app.

Like last year’s models, only the Galaxy S24 Ultra supports Samsung’s S Pen. The stylus lets you interact with the touchscreen more precisely and naturally than using your fingers.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: price and availability

A Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus laying on concrete.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Samsung’s Galaxy S24 Plus and S24 Ultra are the company’s latest flagship smartphones. The Galaxy S24 Plus is available in 256GB and 512GB storage options, and it comes in Onyx Black, Marble Gray, Cobalt Violet, Amber Yellow, Jade Green, Sapphire Blue, and Sandstone Orange color options. It starts at $1,000.

On the other hand, the Galaxy S24 Ultra is the most advanced model in the series. It comes in Titanium Black, Titanium Gray, Titanium Violet, Titanium Yellow, Titanium Green, Titanium Blue, and Titanium Orage color options and is available in 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB storage options. It starts at $1,300, making it one of the most expensive smartphones on the market.

Galaxy S24 Ultra vs. Galaxy S24 Plus: verdict

A person holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra.
Galaxy S24 Ultra Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Plus and Galaxy S24 Ultra offer similar experiences as they have almost identical displays, chipsets, and software tools. However, if you want the best and most advanced experience, the Galaxy S24 Ultra is the one to go for. It has an all-new titanium body, an improved camera system, and a slightly larger display. It is also the only one available with 1TB of storage.

However, it’s important to also take into account that the Ultra costs $1,300. It’s the most expensive non-folding smartphone you can buy in 2024, and for many people, it may be out of their budget range. The Galaxy S24 Plus is still an expensive phone at $1,000, but is the Ultra really worth an extra $300? Unless you need the bigger screen, better camera zoom, or the S Pen, we’d argue not.

You ultimately can’t go wrong with either phone, as they’re two of the best Android phones you can buy in 2024. What it comes down to is your budget. If you want an all-around flagship Android phone that isn’t outrageously expensive, the S24 Plus is hard to beat. But if you have extra cash to spend and want the best of the best, the S24 Ultra has everything you could ask for — and then some.


Editors’ Recommendations






Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus review: better than the S24 Ultra? | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus review: better than the S24 Ultra? | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus

MSRP $1,000.00

“With lovely hardware, a gorgeous screen, and excellent battery, the Galaxy S24 Plus is the big Samsung phone to buy in 2024.”

Pros

  • The flat sides are wonderful
  • New QHD+ screen looks fantastic
  • Runs fast and cool
  • One UI 6.1 is really nice
  • Seven years of updates
  • Phenomenal battery life
  • It’s a surprisingly good value

Cons

  • Camera struggles with moving objects
  • Galaxy AI features are hit-or-miss

For years, Samsung’s “Plus” model in its Galaxy S family has felt like a weird addition. The Plus phones are often very good, but when you can spend an extra $200 for the nicer and more powerful Ultra model, what’s the point? This year, with the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus, things are a little different.

The S24 Plus enters 2024 with a refreshed design, a nicer screen, and a seriously impressive processor. It also has the same $1,000 price tag that the Plus model has had for a few years now. Meanwhile, the Galaxy S24 Ultra’s new $1,300 price means there’s now a larger $300 gulf between the Plus and Ultra phones. Add it all together, and it means Samsung’s Plus phone is a lot more attractive than it’s ever been.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: design

The purple Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus resting against a white pole.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus looks a lot like its Galaxy S23 Plus sibling. It weighs the same at 196 grams, is less than a millimeter taller and 1/10th of a millimeter thicker, and has the same camera design on the back. Samsung didn’t reinvent the wheel with this one. However, the S24 Plus isn’t completely identical to its predecessor. In fact, there’s one fairly substantial change: flat sides.

Last year’s S23 Plus has an aluminum frame with rounded, glossy sides. It was a completely fine design choice and one I quite liked at the time. The S24 Plus still uses aluminum, but its frame now has flat edges with a matte finish. It’s basically the same thing you’ll find on the iPhone 15, and I really like it.

Although the new frame doesn’t radically change the Galaxy S24 Plus’ design, it’s a welcome upgrade across the board. The matte finish looks nicer and doesn’t attract any fingerprints, the flat frame has been easier to grip on to, and I think it gives the phone a more polished, refined look. It’s subtle, but it grew on me quickly.

Otherwise, this is basically the same phone as last year. The Galaxy S24 Plus has an IP68 rating for reliable dust and water resistance, Gorilla Glass 2 protects the screen, and the back glass also has a matte finish to match the frame. I have the S24 Plus in the Cobalt Violet color, and think it looks nice. The power and volume buttons are clicky, the speakers sound nice (despite being a little tinny), and the in-screen fingerprint sensor works like a charm.

I’d also like to stress just how polished and premium the whole package feels. When holding the Galaxy S24 Plus side by side with a Pixel 8 Pro or OnePlus 11, Samsung’s phone feels nicer. It’s a small thing, but one I couldn’t help but notice.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: screen

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

As good as the Galaxy S24 Plus’ design is, that’s not the part of the phone you’ll spend the most time looking at. That would be its screen and, thankfully, it’s a fantastic one.

The Galaxy S24 Plus gets a 6.7-inch AMOLED 2X panel, which is slightly larger than the 6.6-inch one its predecessor had. The peak brightness has also been increased from 1,750 nits all the way up to 2,600 nits, and the resolution has shot up from FHD+ to QHD+. In terms of raw numbers, that’s a jump from 2340 x 1080 pixels to 3120 x 1440. On top of all that, the 120Hz refresh rate can now scale down to just 1Hz, meaning it uses less power when you’re not interacting with the screen.

The Galaxy S24 Plus has a fantastic screen.

Last year’s Galaxy S23 Plus already had a lovely display, and the upgrades Samsung added to the S24 Plus display make it that much better. It hasn’t been particularly sunny in Southwest Michigan during my review period, but under a lot of gray and overcast skies, I’ve had zero issues seeing the screen outdoors. Based on its performance so far, I have no doubt it’ll handle sunnier days just as well — whenever that happens. I also love how dim the Galaxy S24 Plus can get. When placed side by side with my iPhone 15 Pro Max, the S24 Plus’ screen is noticeably darker at its lowest brightness setting — a nice perk if you use your phone in bed next to your partner and don’t want to disturb them.

Display resolution options on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The resolution bump has also been great. The S24 Plus is set to FHD+ by default, but you can switch to QHD+ at any time from the Settings app. It’s not a dramatic difference, but it does make text on the screen sharper to my eyes — particularly smaller fonts.

It’s expected for Samsung to deliver great displays on its phones at this point, but I’ve been especially happy with the S24 Plus in this department. Other than a slightly smaller size and no Gorilla Armor glass for reduced reflections, the S24 Plus’ screen is every bit as good as its Ultra sibling. And when you factor in the $300 price difference this year, that’s no small feat.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: cameras

A close-up photo of the rear cameras on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

While Samsung made a lot of upgrades to the Galaxy S24 Plus’ screen, the same can’t be said of the phone’s cameras. The physical camera hardware is identical to that of the S23 Plus:

  • 50MP main camera, f/1.8 aperture
  • 10MP telephoto camera, f/2.4 aperture, 3x optical zoom
  • 12MP ultrawide camera, f/2.2 aperture, 120-degree field of view
  • 12MP selfie camera, f/2.2 aperture

That’s a respectable camera setup and very similar to the cameras on the iPhone 15 Pro. Are they any good? Yes, but with a caveat.

If you’re taking a photo of a landscape, a pastry, a still dog, or any other non-moving object, the Galaxy S24 Plus produces very good photos. Samsung created a new “dedicated color tuning solution” for the entire Galaxy S24 series. with the goal of delivering a “more accurate and natural color tone.”

If you ask me, it works. Some photos still have a tiny bit more pop of color than you’d see in similar shots from an iPhone, but photos never look overly saturated to my eye. All of the above photos were taken with the 50-megapixel main camera.

However, the minute you introduce any movement, the Galaxy S24 Plus struggles. A cat moving around on a bed or stool? Blurry photos. A dog playing with a chew toy? Very blurry photos. A bearded dragon just barely moving around on someone’s shoulder? It’s enough to trip up the autofocus and result in a less than ideal photo.

This isn’t an entirely new problem for Samsung phones, but for whatever reason, it’s seemed especially prevalent on the Galaxy S24 Plus.

What about the other cameras? They’re pretty good. The ultrawide camera’s 120-degree field of view is really nice, and the colors are very similar to the main camera’s. The telephoto camera’s cap of 3x optical zoom isn’t very impressive in 2024, but if you need to get closer to your subject, it gets the job done.

You can technically zoom all the way up to 30x in the camera app, but I’d advise against it. Anything beyond 3x is just a digital zoom, and it shows. I’ve taken some 10x photos that are usable (like the above photo of the squirrel), but that’s really as far as you’ll want to go.

A selfie of Joe Maring, taken with the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Finally, we have the selfie camera. It’s good, yet nothing special, producing sharp-looking photos with good colors. I’ve been happy with it.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: performance

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus with its screen turned on.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Under the hood of the Galaxy S24 Plus is Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 chip. It’s the go-to processor for all flagship Android phones this year, and it’s proven to be an absolute beast in the S24 Plus. Last year’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 was a stupendous performer in every phone we tested it in last year, and so far, the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 is already proving to be a noticeable upgrade.

As far as day-to-day performance is concerned, the Galaxy S24 Plus flies through everything you throw at it. Apps open immediately, multitasking is extremely smooth (thanks to 12GB of RAM), and all of One UI 6’s animations are as fluid as can be. Good, everyday performance has been expected of every flagship for the last few years, but the S24 Plus has felt especially snappy during my time with it.

The Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 is already proving to be a noticeable upgrade.

That good performance also translates to gaming. Call of Duty: Mobile — my go-to mobile game of choice — runs beautifully on the Galaxy S24 Plus. The phone handles CoD: Mobile at Medium graphics and 120 frames per second (fps) without breaking a sweat. More importantly, it can handle multiple rounds of the game without ever feeling hot. The Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 has also been an efficiency monster, but I’ll get to that in the battery section.

It is worth mentioning that only the U.S. model of the Galaxy S24 Plus has the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3. If you buy the phone in another country, it gets an Exnyos 2400 chipset. While I haven’t used an international version of the S24 Plus, Samsung’s Exynos chips don’t have the best reputation, and they often trail behind their Qualcomm counterparts. Just something to keep in mind.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: Galaxy AI

An example of Galaxy AI's Edit Suggestions feature on the Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

OK — it’s time to talk about AI. No matter which Galaxy S24 model you buy, Samsung’s big pitch for all three phones is Galaxy AI. This is a collection of artificial intelligence features that extend across photo editing, translation, and other aspects of the phone. Some of them are very good, others are hit-or-miss, and some are downright bad.

The photo-editing Galaxy AI features have been my favorites so far. There are two main components to this: Edit Suggestions and Generative Edit. The former is shown in the photo above. When you’re looking at a picture in the Gallery app, you can swipe up to see its metadata. After a second, you’ll see suggested edits for that picture.

These can include things like adding background blur, removing shadows or reflections, or remastering the photo with improved colors/brightness. All of these edits happen locally on-device, meaning they don’t require an internet connection. The results have also looked quite good during my testing.

The second big photo-editing feature is Generative Edit. This enables you to make even more aggressive edits to photos, such as repositioning objects and removing them from photos entirely. It requires an internet connection, and the edits take a few seconds to process, but they often look really good! See the removed bench and dirty snow in the example above.

Galaxy AI also has a big focus on translation features. Live Translate translates and transcribes phone calls when you’re speaking to someone who speaks a different language, while the Interpreter mode offers real-time translations when you’re speaking to someone face-to-face. I haven’t had a chance to use these two features during my time with the Galaxy S24 Plus, and I imagine that’ll be the case for most people who buy the phone. Interpreter isn’t all that different from what you can get on any Android phone with Google Translate, but it is cool having a language translator that works entirely offline without a required data connection.

Screenshots of Chat Assist examples from the Samsung Galaxy S24.
Chat Assist Digital Trends

Then we get to the AI features in the Samsung Keyboard. The Galaxy S24’s keyboard has a Chat Assist feature that can analyze a message you type and attempt to change its tone/style — such as making it more professional or more casual. It technically works, but the results are laughable. Why text your partner, “I’m heading to the store to pick up a couple of things for dinner. Do you need anything?” when you could say, “I will be going to the store to procure a few items for the evening meal. Is there anything you require?” Thank you, Samsung.

You’ll also find Galaxy AI in the Notes, Voice Recorder, and Samsung Internet apps — where AI is used to format and summarize notes for you, transcribe your recordings, and summarize webpages.

Circle to Search looking up a burger on a Samsung Galaxy S24.
Circle to Search Digital Trends

Another AI feature — which is more of a Google one than a Samsung one — is Circle to Search. This one is pretty cool. If you press and hold on the S24’s home button or navigation bar (depending on if you’re using buttons or gesture navigation), you can tap, circle, or scribble on anything on your screen to perform a Google Search for it. It’s really handy if you see something on your phone you want to search for, but aren’t exactly sure how to put it into words. It’s not always perfect, but when it works, it can be kind of shocking. I circled a picture of a burger I ate when I was in Las Vegas for CES 2024, and Circle to Search identified the exact type of burger it was and the restaurant where I got it. (Editor’s Note — the hickory burger at Walk-On’s is fantastic).

There are cool things happening here, but don’t buy any Galaxy S24 just for the AI tricks.

Samsung has some really good ideas with Galaxy AI, and a few of them are off to a great start. But are any of these a reason to buy the Galaxy S24 Plus in and of themselves? I’d argue not. I’ve had fun playing with the photo-editing features, and it’s nice to know I can translate phone calls should I ever find myself in that situation. But none of these things are must-have features — at least not for the way I use my phone.

It’s also important to note the future of Galaxy AI. Not only has Samsung confirmed that Galaxy AI is eventually coming to other Samsung phones in the future, but it will also eventually charge you money for some (or all) of Galaxy AI. There are cool things happening here, but don’t buy any Galaxy S24 just for the AI tricks.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: software

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus resting on a concrete slab, with the screen turned on and showing the home screen.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Plus ships with Android 14, and in typical Samsung fashion, it’s customized with Samsung’s One UI interface — specifically, One UI 6.1. One UI traditionally hasn’t been my preferred way to use Android, largely because it can feel bloated and more cumbersome than other Android interfaces. However, One UI 6.1 adds some great new features.

One of my favorite updates in One UI 6.1 is the Quick Settings panel. It’s been redesigned with more sensible controls, and I think it works quite well. Your Wi-Fi and Bluetooth toggles are much more prominent at the top, and the brightness slider is joined by nearby shortcuts for Eye Comfort Shield and Dark Mode. You can also show the full Quick Settings at any time by doing a single swipe from the top-right corner of the phone (just like how you access Control Center on iOS).

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus. The screen is on and showing the phone's Quick Settings.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Speaking of iPhone similarities, the always-on display now defaults to showing the lock screen wallpaper — the same way the iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 15 Pro do. The iPhone inspiration is pretty on the nose, but I like having this option. Just like on the iPhone, I think it makes the always-on display more visually interesting and gives the S24 Plus some added personality. The good news? You can easily turn off the wallpaper if you don’t like it.

There are other smaller changes throughout One UI 6.1 that I also quite like:

  • You can move the lock screen clock anywhere you want.
  • Many of Samsung’s first-party apps have simplified names (e.g. Notes instead of Samsung Notes).
  • Notifications are more prominent and easier to see.

But it’s not all perfect. There are plenty of One UI features I don’t use — such as Bixby and the Galaxy Themes store. The Samsung Keyboard is very bad and should be avoided at all costs. Samsung’s software still has some quirks, and I still personally prefer the simpler interfaces of Google Pixel and Motorola phones. But One UI 6.1 does feel like a step in the right direction, and that’s great to see.

As Samsung keeps making those right steps, the Galaxy S24 Plus will see the fruits of the company’s labor for a while to come. That’s because the S24 Plus is promised seven years of Android updates and security patches. This seven-year promise applies to all Galaxy S24 models — including the regular S24 and the S24 Ultra – and it’s a fantastic addition to the phones.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: battery and charging

A Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus showing its battery settings.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Battery life may be one of the Galaxy S24 Plus’ most impressive qualities. Inside the phone is a 4,900mAh battery, which is 200mAh larger than the S23 Plus’ battery. Combined with the improved efficiency of the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 and the display’s refresh rate, that all translates to phenomenal endurance.

Even while running the phone with the QHD+ screen resolution and the always-on display enabled (with the option to show the wallpaper), the S24 Plus still churns out excellent battery performance. One of my first days with the phone started with 100% battery at 8:10 a.m. and ended at 10:55 p.m. with 38% battery still remaining. That included over an hour of downloading game assets for Call of Duty: Mobile, lots of Telegram use, as well as time spent on Twitter, Chrome, Instagram, and plenty of other apps. Once all was said and done, I had 4 hours and 15 minutes of screen-on time.

With more moderate use, the Galaxy S24 Plus is easily a two-day smartphone. Another day saw me start with 100% battery at 8:50 a.m. and still have 50% remaining at 12:30 a.m. early the next day. And that was on a day with 2 hours and 50 minutes of screen time — including over 20 minutes of CoD: Mobile and more than 40 minutes of watching YouTube.

The USB-C port on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

This is top-notch battery life, and you can easily make it even more impressive. If you switch the screen resolution to FHD+ and disable the wallpaper for the AOD — which are minor tweaks — I have no doubt you could squeeze out two-and-a-half or three days of battery life. Samsung killed it here.

When it comes time to charge the Galaxy S24 Plus, you can get up to 45W wired charging speeds and 15W wireless charging speeds. Using the 45W wired charging, the S24 Plus goes from 3% to 43% after 20 minutes and reaches 100% battery after a little over an hour. It’s not as impressive as the 80W charging you get on the OnePlus 12, but it’s also faster than phones like the Google Pixel 8 Pro and iPhone 15 Pro Max. Additionally, there’s 4.5W reverse wireless charging if you need to juice up another phone or a pair of earbuds.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: price and availability

A Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus sitting upright against a white pole.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus is available for purchase now and is available through Samsung’s official website, Amazon, Best Buy, and most major carriers across the U.S. It starts at $1,000 for the base model with 256GB of storage. You can also get a 512GB storage version for $1,200.

The Galaxy S24 Plus is available in four base colors that are available everywhere: Onyx Black, Marble Gray, Amber Yellow, and Cobalt Violet (the color of my review unit). And Samsung has a few exclusive colors you’ll only find on its website — including Jade Green, Sapphire Blue, and Sandstone Orange.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus: verdict

A violet Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus lying face-down on a shelf.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S23 Plus was a phone I really liked, but I wasn’t sure who to recommend it to. The Galaxy S24 Plus is another great smartphone from Samsung, and this time around, it makes a lot more sense.

If you’re in the market for a big Samsung phone, the S24 Plus would be my personal recommendation over the S24 Ultra. The hardware is top-tier, the screen is almost every bit as good, the performance is great, the battery life is outstanding, and — if you care about them — you get all of the same Galaxy AI features. The only differences between the S24 Plus and the S24 Ultra are the improved camera system and the S Pen. But is that really worth an extra $300? I certainly don’t think so. The Galaxy S24 Ultra is a fantastic smartphone and one of the best you can buy in 2024. But it’s also $1,300.

The Galaxy S24 Plus’ biggest downside is that its camera system isn’t up-to-par with other phones in this price range. It’s not terrible, but if that’s your main focus (pun 100% intended), there are better choices out there — namely the Google Pixel 8 Pro. But the Pixel also has worse performance and battery life, and its display isn’t quite as nice.

The Galaxy S24 Plus is another great smartphone from Samsung, and this time around, it makes a lot more sense.

There’s also the OnePlus 12 to consider, which delivers similarly great performance and battery life for $800. It’s a great package, but you also have to deal with a curved screen, a lower IP rating, no AI tricks, and fewer software updates. The regular Galaxy S24 shares many of the S24 Plus’ great qualities for the same $800 price, but you’ll need to put up with a smaller screen, lesser battery life, and slower charging.

You have a lot of options to consider against the Galaxy S24 Plus, as is the case when you’re looking to buy any smartphone. But each alternative to the S24 Plus also has its own share of compromises. If the Galaxy S24 Plus’ strong suits line up with what you prioritize in a phone — hardware, display, performance, and battery life — I can’t recommend it enough.

Editors’ Recommendations






Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: which one should you buy? | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: which one should you buy? | Digital Trends

Digital Trends

The size increase may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but the Samsung Galaxy S24 is a crushing success anyway. Samsung’s new smaller flagship has a powerful new processor, an upgraded display, and Samsung’s cutting-edge Galaxy AI. If you’re looking for a powerful phone at a price less than four figures, then the Samsung Galaxy S24’s $800 price tag is sure to appeal.

But OnePlus is ready with a strong competitor of its own. The OnePlus 12 is a larger phone with the same power, a capable camera suite, and some blindingly fast charging speeds. At the same price, you’ve got a tough job deciding between the two of them, and looking at long lists of specs can quickly make you feel dizzy. That’s why we’re here; we’ve crunched the numbers, placed them side-by-side, and broken down what it means so you don’t have to. Here’s how the Samsung Galaxy S24 compares to the OnePlus 12 — and which one you should buy.

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: specs

Samsung Galaxy S24 OnePlus 12
Size 147.1 x 70.6 x 7.6 mm (5.79 x 2.78 x 0.30 inches) 164.3 x 75.8 x 9.2 mm (6.47 x 2.98 x 0.36 inches)
Weight 168 grams (5.89 ounces) 220 grams (7.76 ounces)
Screen size 6.2-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X (Dynamic 1-120Hz) 6.82-inch LTPO AMOLED (Dynamic 1-120Hz)
Screen resolution 2340 x 1080 resolution at 416 pixels per inch 3168 x 1440 resolution at 510 pixels per inch
Operating system Android 14 with One UI 6.1 Android 14 with OxygenOS 14
Storage 128GB, 256GB 256GB, 512GB
MicroSD card slot No No
Tap-to-pay services Google Pay, Samsung Pay Google Pay
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3
RAM 8GB 12GB, 16GB
Cameras Rear: 50-megapixel primary, 12MP ultrawide, and 10MP telephoto with 3x optical zoom

Front: 12MP

Rear: 50MP primary, 48MP ultrawide, and 64MP periscope telephoto lens with 3x optical zoom

Front: 32MP

Video Rear: Up to 8K at 30 frames per second (fps), 4K at 60 fps, FHD at 120 fps, and 960 fps for slow motion

Front: Up to 4K at 60 fps

Rear: Up to 8K at 24 frames per second (fps), 4K at up to 60 fps, and FHD at up to 480 fps

Front: Up to 4K at 30 fps

Bluetooth Yes, Bluetooth 5.3 Yes, Bluetooth 5.3
Ports USB-C USB-C
Biometrics Ultrasonic in-display fingerprint sensor and face recognition Optical in-display fingerprint sensor
Water resistance IP68 IP68
Battery 4,000mAh

Super Fast Charging 2.0 (25W)

Fast Wireless Charging 2.0 (15W)

Wireless PowerShare (4.5W)

5,400mAh

Fast charging (80W)

Fast wireless charging (50W)

Reverse wireless charging (10W)

App marketplace Google Play Store Google Play Store
Network support 5G 5G
Colors Cobalt Violet, Amber Yellow, Marble Gray, Onyx Black Flowy Emerald, Silky Black, Silver
Price From $800 From $800
Available from All major offline and online retailers OnePlus, Amazon, Best Buy

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: design and display

Putting aside the large size difference, at first glance, the OnePlus 12 and Galaxy S24 are rather similar looking. Viewed from the front, you’ve got a full-screen bezel-less design with a centrally placed hole-punch selfie camera. But flip them over, and these are two dramatically different phones. Where the Galaxy S24 has a rather understated rear panel with three quietly placed camera lenses, the OnePlus 12 explodes with uniqueness. The frosted glass back panel collides with a massive round camera suite, leaving a real impression. Your mileage will vary on which of these you prefer, but we really dig the OnePlus 12’s Frosted Emerald colorway.

That design doesn’t come without its pitfalls, though. The back glass is slippery, and its large size and weight make it difficult to manage with a single hand. The edges are also a bit strange, with tapered curves on the sides but flat edges at the top and bottom. It’s an odd combination that detracts from the otherwise great design. The Galaxy S24 doesn’t suffer from this. It’s smaller and lighter, and the rounded frame has been dropped in favor of iPhone-like flat edges. It may be derivative, but it feels and looks great, and it’s much easier to handle than the big OnePlus 12.

The OnePlus 12 has a 6.82-inch LTPO AMOLED display, running at a 3168 x 1440 resolution, resulting in a crisp 510 pixels per inch. Brightness reaches an insane 4,500 nits, which is almost twice what most other flagship phones offer, and it also benefits from a 120Hz refresh rate. The S24’s 6.2-inch display isn’t as crisp or bright, but at 416 pixels per inch from a 2340 x 1080 resolution, it’s no slouch either. Its big advantage over the OnePlus 12 is its underlying screen tech. The Dynamic AMOLED 2X tech delivers vivid colors and inky blacks. Both phones have 120Hz refresh rates that can scale all the way down to 1Hz when you aren’t interacting with the screen.

This is a tough category to call, as these are two rather different phones. Where the Galaxy S24 is sleek, small, and understated, the OnePlus 12 is big, bold, and unique. The OnePlus phone has a sharper display, but Samsung’s is more colorful. This is a tie.

Winner: Tie

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: performance, battery life, charging

A white Galaxy S24 laying on top of a gray Galaxy S24.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Want power? You’ve got power. Both of these phones are stupendously powerful, thanks to the inclusion of the Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 processor. However, the rest of the specs are quite different. The Galaxy S24 has 8GB of RAM, which is a standard amount of RAM for a flagship smartphone in 2024. On the flip side, the OnePlus 12 has access to variants with 12GB and 16GB of RAM. Simply put, this is ludicrous and a little silly. Does your phone need that much RAM? Absolutely not — it’s just spec list filler. You’re unlikely to notice any real difference between the Galaxy S24 and the OnePlus 12, even with the larger amounts of RAM.

But one area where the OnePlus 12’s big numbers make a difference is storage. The Galaxy S24 starts at a 128GB storage option, and that’s just not enough storage for 2024 when 4K and 8K pictures and videos are in play. Sure, you can pay more to get 256GB of storage, but the OnePlus 12 starts at $800 for 256GB, and has the option to upgrade to 512GB, too, making it a much stronger option if you’re a download-happy media-lover.

OnePlus 12 in Flowy Emerald showing flat bottom edge.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

What about battery life? The Samsung Galaxy S24 is a very strong performer here. Even with moderate to heavy use, you can still expect around 30% battery remaining at the end of the day. With lighter use, this can be a two-day smartphone. The OnePlus 12’s larger 5,400 mAh battery (compared to the S24’s 4,000 mAh cell) is even more impressive. This is another two-day phone, but you can use the phone harder and more often while still getting those two days.

OnePlus also gets the edge with charging. The OnePlus 12’s charging speeds have been toned down in the U.S., but they still top out at 80W, putting the Galaxy S24’s 25W charging rate to shame. Heck, even the OnePlus 12’s 50W wireless charging rate is twice what Samsung is offering through wired charging.

The RAM numbers may be a bit daft, but the rest of the spec sheet isn’t. The OnePlus 12 takes this on the strength of its storage, battery, and charging options.

Winner: OnePlus 12

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: cameras

OnePlus 12 in Flowy Emerald laying flat on table.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

No matter which of these two you pick, you’re gonna get a whole lot of cameras. The Samsung Galaxy S24’s camera is largely unchanged from last year, but given how good it was, that’s not a bad thing. There’s a 50-megapixel main lens, as well as a 12MP ultrawide lens, and a 10MP telephoto with a 3x optical zoom. This is another area where OnePlus’s numbers game is strong, as it has a 50MP main lens, joined by a 48MP ultrawide lens, and a 64MP telephoto lens, also with a 3x optical zoom.

In reality, you’re likely to be happy with either camera setup. The OnePlus 12 does a really great job of capturing pleasing and life-like colors. It also handles moving subjects well. It’s also done a good job with macro and portrait photos.

Samsung Galaxy S24 in Marble Gray camera module.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S24 also does a great job. The S24 still has a tendency to produce more vibrant colors than what you see in real life, but it’s noticeably better than the S23 last year. In our testing, it seems to struggle a bit more with lowlight settings than the OnePlus 12 does.

We’ll continue testing the cameras on both phones over the coming weeks, but with its more true-to-life colors and better lowlight shots, we’re giving the OnePlus 12 the win.

Winner: OnePlus 12

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: software and updates

OnePlus 12 Flowy Emerald showing multitasking split screen view with Outlook and Teams.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

Both of these run Android 14, but you’re getting very different flavors on both. The Galaxy S24 runs One UI 6.1, while the OnePlus 12 runs OxygenOS 14 — and both are manufacturer skins of Android 14. While they have their own design flairs and intricacies, they’ll both run broadly how you expect Android’s latest version to run. OxygenOS is the “cleaner” of the two versions, though, and it’s generally closer to the purer versions of Android you can get on Google Pixel phones. Samsung’s One UI is far from that, but it would be wrong to say it doesn’t have its charm. Both are great pieces of software, and neither are reasons to avoid either phone.

The Samsung Galaxy S24 laying on a shelf with its screen turned on.
Samsung Galaxy S24 Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Those manufacturer skins are great but add time to update speeds. Since neither can just push out an updated Android as-is, you’ll be waiting some time after an official Android release for your phone to be updated. There’s a difference in how many updates you can expect, though. OnePlus promises four years of software updates and five for security updates. That’s a solid schedule and would previously have been above average. However, Samsung now offers an incredible seven years of support, blowing right past OnePlus. Buy the Galaxy S24 in 2024, and you’ll be getting updates all the way to 2031. That’s an incredible promise and a big reason to buy the Samsung phone.

Winner: Samsung Galaxy S24

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: special features

Someone using the Edit Suggestions feature on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The OnePlus 12 is a little light on special features, and that’s probably because OnePlus has thrown so much into other areas of the phone. After all, getting a massive screen, flagship specs, 256GB of storage as standard, and an 80W charging rate means slack has to be taken in somewhere — and it’s likely because of this the OnePlus 12 doesn’t really have a lot to write home about here. Except for one thing: It has a vapor chamber to help keep the phone cool. Supposedly the largest ever put in a smartphone, the “dual cryo-velocity cooling system” helps keep the phone cool even during graphically intensive games. It’s hardly something you can show off to your friends, though, so it doesn’t score many points.

Unlike OnePlus, Samsung loves a special feature, and its phones are stuffed with them. Some old favorites remain, including the desktop-emulating DeX mode, but a big new feature is stealing the show. Galaxy AI is this year’s big new addition to Samsung’s flagship phones, and while it remains to be seen how useful it actually is, it’s off to a good start. Galaxy AI is similar to other AI tools we’ve seen, like Google’s Magic Editor, but it’s been expanding also to encompass message suggestions and even live translations on phone calls. It’s an impressive collection of tools, and it wins this round.

Winner: Samsung Galaxy S24

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: price and availability

OnePlus 12 Flowy Emerald closeup showing top half of back with camera.
Christine Romero-Chan / Digital Trends

The Samsung Galaxy S24 is currently available, and prices start from $800 for the 128GB variant. As a Samsung flagship, you’re likely to find it at most smartphone retailers and carriers.

The OnePlus 12 is also currently available, and you’ll be looking to pay $800 for the base model. But unlike the Galaxy S24, that base version is 256GB — twice the storage of the Galaxy phone. It’s a little more limited in availability, but you can find it on OnePlus’s website, Amazon, and Best Buy.

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. OnePlus 12: which should you buy?

Two Samsung Galaxy S24 units standing upright next to each other.
Samsung Galaxy S24 Joe Maring / Digital Trends

These are two incredible smartphones, and there are a lot of reasons to buy each. But really, it’s easy to boil it down to a single question: How big do you want your phone to be? If you want a big flagship smartphone and don’t want to pay Galaxy S24 Plus or S24 Ultra prices, then the OnePlus 12 is a great way to get one. But if a smaller screen appeals to you, the Samsung Galaxy S24 is the better choice.

Let’s go a little deeper: Do you love media, or do you intend to take advantage of 4K and 8K video shooting? The OnePlus 12 allows you to grab loads of storage at a lower price, which is an asset in itself. It also has truly incredible fast charging, which means you’ll spend more time using your phone rather than waiting for it to charge. Just as the smartphone gods intended.

But the Samsung Galaxy S24 is no slouch here either. With the stronger display tech, a pocket-friendly design, and the helpful tricks of Galaxy AI, you’ve got a fantastic pocket pal. The OnePlus 12 offers more bang for your buck and is likely the better choice for most people. But if you really want a smaller phone, the S24 won’t let you down.


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Did Your Wallet Survive the Apple Vision Pro and Samsung Galaxy S24 Launch This Week?

Did Your Wallet Survive the Apple Vision Pro and Samsung Galaxy S24 Launch This Week?

Image: Skylight, Jorge Jimenez / Gizmodo, Photo: Kyle Barr / Gizmodo, Christoph Dernbach/picture alliance (Getty Images), Florence Ion / Gizmodo, Kyle Barr / Gizmodo, Angel Fajardo / Gizmodo, Kyle Barr / Gizmodo, Dan Ackerman / Gizmodo

The Apple Vision Pro is finally on sale, and we’ve got all the info you need on it before you decide to spend $3,500 on a mixed-reality headset. The Samsung Galaxy S24 was also released this week, and its best features might actually surprise you. Oh, and we found a giant digital calendar that should help organize your life.

Click through for our top product news and reviews from this week.

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: don’t make a mistake | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: don’t make a mistake | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy S24 (left) and Galaxy S24 Plus Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Samsung’s Galaxy Unpacked event has come and gone, but ut brought with it tthe all-new Galaxy S24 series. While the Ultra is the talk of the town, you may also find yourself deciding between the regular Galaxy S24 and the Galaxy S24 Plus.

If you’re contemplating picking up an S24 for yourself, you may be wondering what the differences are between the regular S24 and the S24 Plus, aside from the size. Lucky for you, that’s where we come in. Here’s what you need to know.

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: specs

Samsung Galaxy S24 Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus
Display 6.2-inch FHD+

1080 x 2340 resolution

416 ppi

6.7-inch QHD+

1440 x 3120 resolution

513 ppi

Peak brightness 2,600 nits 2,600 nits
Dimensions and weight 5.79 x 2.78 x 0.30 inches

5.93 ounces

6.24 x 3.00 x 0.30 inches

6.95 ounces

Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy
Memory and storage 8GB/128GB

8GB/256GB

12GB/256GB

12GB/512GB

Colors Cobalt Violet

Amber Yellow

Marble Gray

Onyx Black

Jade Green (Samsung exclusive)

Sapphire Blue (Samsung exclusive)

Sandstone Orange (Samsung exclusive)

Cobalt Violet

Amber Yellow

Marble Gray

Onyx Black

Jade Green (Samsung exclusive)

Sapphire Blue (Samsung exclusive)

Sandstone Orange (Samsung exclusive)

Camera 50MP main

12MP ultrawide

10MP telephoto

12MP selfie

50MP main

12MP ultrawide

10MP telephoto

12MP selfie

Battery 4,000mAh 4,900mAh
Charging 25W wired

15W wireless

4.5W reverse wireless

45W wired

15W wireless

4.5W reverse wireless

Price Starting at $800 Starting at $1000

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: design and display

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 and Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Both the S24 and S24 Plus have a new, refreshed design compared to their predecessors. The new design features flat edges and a matte glass back, similar to the iPhone 15. The flat sides make it a bit more comfortable to hold over longer periods of time.

The Galaxy S24 and S24 Plus look pretty much identical, even down to the color options. Speaking of colors, you can get the S24 and S24 Plus in these standard colors: Cobalt Violet, Amber Yellow, Marble Gray, and Onyx Black. There are also three Samsung.com exclusive colors: Jade Green, Sapphire Blue, and Sandstone Orange.

The biggest difference between the S24 and S24 Plus, though, is the size of the flat display. The base Galaxy S24 features a 6.2-inch FHD+ AMOLED display with 1080 x 2340 pixel resolution and 416 pixels per inch (ppi), while the S24 Plus has a 6.7-inch QHD+ AMOLED display with 1440 x 3120 resolution and 513 ppi.

Two Samsung Galaxy S24 units standing upright next to each other.
Samsung Galaxy S24 Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Other than that, the displays are similar. They both use LTPO panels with a dynamic refresh rate between 1Hz to 120Hz. Samsung has also bumped up the peak brightness across all models, including the S24 Ultra, to 2,600 nits.

Again, both the Galaxy S24 and S24 Plus are pretty much the same aside from the size. If you prefer smaller, more compact phones, then the S24 is the way to go. But if you prefer a larger display, then go for the S24 Plus.

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: performance and software

The multitasking screen on the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Samsung equipped both the S24 and S24 Plus with the latest Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy chip. The cooling system on the S24 lineup has also been redesigned and optimized for better heat dissipation.

There are some minor differences between the configurations for the S24 and S24 Plus. The base model S24 only has 8GB RAM, with 128GB or 256GB storage options. The S24 Plus, however, has 12GB RAM. It also starts at 256GB and goes up to 512GB storage. Neither one offers expandable storage.

The Galaxy S24 lineup comes with Android 14 with One UI 6.1 layered on top. Samsung has launched a whole slate of new AI-powered features via Galaxy AI with the S24 line. These new AI tools include real-time translation on phone calls and voice and text messages, intelligently summarized and formatted notes, generative photo-editing tools, Circle to Search, and more.

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 with the display turned on.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

Aside from the RAM and storage capacity difference, the Galaxy S24 and S24 Plus are basically the same in terms of processor and software features. All of the AI tools are available on both devices, so you aren’t missing out on something if you go with the base model over the Plus.

Samsung will also offer seven years of major software upgrades on the S24 lineup, including the S24 and S24 Plus. This is a move to bring it in line with Google’s Pixel series. With a seven-year road map, that means both the S24 and S24 Plus should last up to Android 21.

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: cameras

A white Galaxy S24 laying on top of a gray Galaxy S24.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

On the camera front, the Galaxy S24 and S24 Plus are pretty much identical. Both have a 50-megapixel main camera with an f/1.8 aperture and 85-degree field of view with optical image stabilization (OIS), a 12MP ultrawide camera with an f/2.2 aperture and a 120-degree field of view, and a 10MP telephoto camera with an f/2.4 aperture, a 36-degree field of view, and 3x optical zoom range. The front-facing selfie camera is 12MP, with f/2.2 aperture and an 80-degree field of view.

One of the flaws of Samsung devices, in general, has been the oversaturation of colors from the resulting photographs. Thankfully, Samsung seems to have improved the algorithms behind color representation in photos, so the results should be more true to life than before. There have also been other improvements to lowlight performance, so night photos should be sharper, brighter, and overall better than before.

The camera systems on both the S24 and S24 Plus are pretty much identical, so one won’t be better than the other. The S24 Ultra, on the other hand, has the best camera system out of the entire S24 lineup.

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: battery and charging

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 Plus and showing the USB-C port.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

The Galaxy S24 Plus has a 4,900mAh battery, whereas the regular Galaxy S24 has a 4,000mAh cell. That’s due to the size of the devices; the larger S24 Plus has more room for a larger battery cell inside, while the S24 does not. For comparison purposes, the S24 Ultra has a 5,000mAh battery, so the S24 Plus is very close to it-

For charging, the Galaxy S24 Plus is also better, as it offers 45-watt, wired fast charging speeds. The Galaxy S24, on the other hand, only has up to 25W charging speeds.

Unfortunately, Samsung decided not to adopt the Qi2 magnetic wireless charging standard for the S24 line, so wireless charging for both the S24 and S24 Plus is still capped at 15W. They both also have 4.5W reverse wireless charging.

Galaxy S24 vs. S24 Plus: verdict

Someone holding the Samsung Galaxy S24 and Galaxy S24 Plus.
Joe Maring / Digital Trends

When it comes down to it, the S24 and S24 Plus are almost identical. They have the same overall design, cameras, and software features.

As you try and make a decision between the two, it really comes down to this: Do you prefer smaller phones, or do you want a larger display and more battery life? And, of course, don’t forget to factor in the cost — a larger phone also has a bigger price tag.

Aside from these factors, though, the S24 and S24 Plus will offer the same overall experience. In other words, you can’t go wrong either way.


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